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20121121
20121121
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. >> you are defending a florida supreme court opinion which says must. you cannot just say, you know, i am not asserting any particular thing is necessary, adjusted tell the. you have an opinion here in which the florida supreme court says must. it must include, you know, the feel of things. you disavow that or you want us to ignore it? >> that is not the holding on which i am relying here. the holding and which i am relying is that training and certification alone, the mere fact of training and certification alone is not sufficient to establish the dodger liability. and hence the language about must, rubber, the florida supreme court did not just say that failure to produce one of these elements necessitated reversal. then when engaged in the totality of the circumstance test. several lower courts applying that case, applying harris have reached the same conclusion. in two of those cases -- >> this is absent in the fatality of the circumstances. and to none the less poll that there was probable cause, must does not mean must. >> must means must if the state has the record, if the records
vote in florida within 0.2%. >> you are confident in your data because of the redundancy you had. tell us about the date you got every night. >> i hope we get into my feelings on american polling, especially the public wants, we decided to go deep. we had an hour and alex team and do several thousand calls -- >> describe that. >> it was a department they used to data across the campaign to make everyone's job better. we had over 60 full-time analytics people. every night they would do thousands of random sample calls. every night i had to look in all of the battleground states and every night they would run, a 66,000 bottles of the campaign. >> that has been said before. what does that mean? >> we built a model similar to run the campaign over and over and over. it gives us a likelihood of caring that state. that allows our media team to spend money wiser in the battleground state. it means you run that many simulations to get a statistically relevant sample to make sure the data was right. every night they did that. then we had our talented pollster. then we had state posters. each ha
a republican who workedke bobby, with democrats to put together a state wide scholarship bill. in florida, they had the scholarship program, for kids to get scholarships to go to private schools, when that was passed 10 years ago, we had one member of the black caucus vote for it. when it came up for renewal, we have the majority of black and hispanic caucus vote for it. each of them said we are doing this because it is helping our children. as we move forward, that has got to beat the order of the day for our country. thank you all very much. i appreciate your generosity. i want to take some questions before we have to wrap up. thank you. [applause] k you very much,. . i appreciate what you are doing. in california, we have not adopted as much, doctors and twice as you have seen in washington d.c. when we introduce choice, the public schools, the bar will rise because they have to keep up with the charter schools. is that a belief you experienced in washington d.c.? what happened to the public schools and how they performed when that 42% to place? >> it makes a difference. i do not think
was within 1%. our modeling predicted our final vote in florida within 0.2%. >> you are confident in your data because of the redundancy you had. tell us about the date you got every night. >> i hope we get into my feelings on american polling, especially the public wants, we decided to go deep. we had an hour and alex team and do several thousand calls -- >> describe that. >> it was a department they used to data across the campaign to make everyone's job better. we had over 60 full-time analytics people. every night they would do thousands of random sample calls. every night i had to look in all of the battleground states and every night they would run, a 66,000 bottles of the campaign. >> that has been said before. what does that mean? >> we built a model similar to run the campaign over and over and over. it gives us a likelihood of caring that state. that allows our media team to spend money wiser in the battleground state. it means you run that many simulations to get a statistically relevant sample to make sure the data was right. every night they did that. then we had our talented
, florida, on the democratic line. go ahead. caller: i want to speak on the fiscal cliff. who controls the fiscal cliff? is it congress? host: there are ongoing negotiations over the various fiscal policies that need to be changed between congress and the white house, burt congress makes -- but congress is the one who makes the laws. caller: president obama could not put anything in there before his term going out. i have been following this for years. usually the incoming president has bills that the previous president left. on this president's way out, congress would not let him put any deals in. they put enough in there to finish his term. host: the president has been reelected and will be back in next year. but i appreciate the call. i want to point to an obituary in the new york times today on the death of warren redmon. he dies at age 82. the sometimes combative centrist republican senator from new hampshire. you will be seeing those obituaries in several papers today. coming up next, a top supreme court reporter david savage will join us to talk about some of that the-profile ca
day -- you will love this one -- i was speaking to 400 people in florida. i said the same thing you have to be a party of inclusion. i said if i could make my point, would all the blacks in the room please stand up? not one black in the room. there were two hispanics. if the republican party is not going to reach out and find common ground with these other groups that live in the united states of america, they are not going to win any other elections in the future. if they have no leadership to bring that out, they don't have a voice of inclusion, it is going to be worse. stuart: i have two politically oriented people sitting next to me. andrea? >> i have to challenge you a little bit on that, michael. i mean, dependency is at the root of this problem. so i don't care if mitt romney was a female hispanic, i mean there were two females, carly fiorina excellent ceos and meg whitman running in the state of california. it's not who the messenger is. it is the message people don't like. >> i disagree with you. [talking over each other] >> -- doesn't mean you have immunity from being a ta
student in florida who said here's what she does to complete her assignments that require internet access. she drives to her local library at night after it is closed, and sits in the parking lot where she can get wi-fi hookup. well, that's not a good answer to the digital divide is a real issue and smart government action can help drive universal access. this is what drove the fcc last year to adopt a once in a generation comprehensive overhaul of the $4.5 billion a year universal service fund. we transformed it from a telephone focused program and a waste one at that, too inefficient program focused on universal broadband. so these pillars and priorities not only guide our policy work in the united states, a guide our international engagement in the itc sector. and they have in the past, historically, in ways that have had profound effect. to explain how, let me take a detour into the air by spring. in egypt last year when the government shutdown the internet and shut down global service, many asked how are they able to do that. what does it mean that they can do that. it's a very impor
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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